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  • Angela Harrison 6:45 am on December 27, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Another research How-to about British India. From familysearch. Interesting! its a pdf
    https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/images/7/79/East%2BIndia%2BCompany%2BRecords.pdf

     
  • Angela Harrison 1:23 pm on December 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    The story of Madras, a transcribed book from Project Gutenburg, with interesting maps and information about the area. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/26621/26621-h/26621-h.htm

     
  • Angela Harrison 1:21 pm on December 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    Extensive list of British India and EIC research resources from a 4 year funded study into the time.
    http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/eicah/files/2013/01/Online-Resources-Final-21.08.14.pdf

     
  • Angela Harrison 12:58 pm on December 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    Unattached list sources of records. Abraham was noted to be a store sergeant, unattached list, in the 1850s and 60s
    http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php/Unattached_List

     
  • Angela Harrison 6:24 am on December 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: about this blog info   

    as you can see, right now I am using this site as a dumping ground for leads to follow up! There is so much to do. But I have heaps of cool records to upload shortly. And stories to flesh out.

     
  • Angela Harrison 4:25 am on December 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2nd madras, eic, ,   

    Information about the EIC 2nd madras regiment. There is a record on FIBIS, an 1841 madras muster list, that has an Abraham Harrison as a private in that regiment. After that, he next turns up as a corporal in the 1st madras reg’t of the EIC in 1842 (marriage to matilda sairs) and after that, a store sergeant.

    http://www.nam.ac.uk/research/famous-units/105th-regiment-foot-madras-light-infantry

     
  • Angela Harrison 6:21 pm on December 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , letter, upate   

    just sent this letter to the India mailing list at rootsweb:

    My India family were in Madras, black town sometimes, secunderabad often:

    Abraham HARRISON (my gg gf)
    b: c1811 (unknown, possibly ireland), d: 1884 (ireland)
    (Father is Samuel Harrison, possibly william samuel harrison, no other details known)
    known to have been in Madras between c1840 and late c1860s

    m(1): Matilda SAIRS (b: 1825, d: 1852), in 1842 (matildas parents are William and Sophia Sairs)
    ch: Emily 1843, Richard James 1845, Charles Frederick 1847, Sophia Sarah 1850, Arthur Henry 1852.

    m(2): Harriet Ann HODGSON (my gg gm) (b: 1840, d: 1866) in 1853
    ch: Maria Alice 1855, William Edward 1857 (d: 1858), Isabella Mary 1859, Samuel Reuben 1860, John George 1862 (d: 1865), Jessie 1863, Edward c1865 (my g gf).

    Abraham went to Ireland, between 1866 and 1872 with some of the children, certainly Samuel Reuben and Edward. There he remarried (3rd marriage) in Irish Town, Athlone, in 1881 and died in 1884. He was on the Lord Clive Pension so I wonder if he married to continue the pension after his death. He married a 34 year old when he was c69.

    Abraham seems to have been a private with ‘A Co’ 2nd Madras European Reg’t according to a FIBIS record of an 1841 muster list. There after he was a corporal then a sergeant in the 1 Madras Regiment, and later a store sergeant, unattached list, after 1855, a pensioned store sergeant. He is noted on 2 death records of his children in 1858 and 1865, to be a Jailor. (seeking info about this)

    Harriet Ann HODGSON, my gg gm, was a child of Thomas HODGSON (b: c1806, d: 1884) and Margaret MCKAY (b: betw1805-1812, d: 1878).
    Both are noted to be Indo-Briton / Hindoo-Briton on 3 of their 10 childrens baptism records.
    Their children were: Margaret Jane 1829, Thomas 1830, William 1832, Maria 1834, Charles 1836, George 1838, Harriet Ann 1840, Alfred Augustus 1843 (d: 1848), Henry 1846 (d: 1848), Jane 1850

    Thomas was a Writer/Writers assistant/Draftsman in the quarter master generals office.

     
  • Angela Harrison 3:53 pm on December 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , records, , sources, tips   

    British Library Genealogy Advice Re British India Records
    http://www.bl.uk/catalogues/iofhs.shtml

     
  • Angela Harrison 3:43 pm on December 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , clues, , ,   

    A PDF with instructions for researching members of the East India Company Military
    http://www.nam.ac.uk/sites/default/files/research-information-1.pdf

     
  • Angela Harrison 8:01 am on December 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Interesting discussion from Rootsweb. Mentions 2nd Madras European Regiment, which Abraham Harrison was a ‘private’ in, in an 1841 Muster List. It notes the 2nd Madras European Regiment was wholly recruited in Ireland and UK, which helps narrow down Abrahams place of birth.

    RootsWeb: INDIA-L Re: [INDIA] MORE HELPFUL INFORMATION …Allowance for Eurasianwives..

    http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/india/2010-01/1264031553

    From: “Ian Macdonnell”
    Subject: Re: [INDIA] MORE HELPFUL INFORMATION …Allowance for Eurasianwives.
    Date: Thu, 21 Jan 2010 10:52:33 +1100
    References:
    In-Reply-To:

    Chairman, Mr Bailey wrote :

    > FIBIS Guide No.1 (Section 12) gives an extract from the General Orders by
    > the Right Honourable the Governor (of Madras) in Council. (General Order
    > No. 6 of 1841). I quote:
    > 21. An allowance of Rs. 3 1/2 per mensem is authorized to East Indian
    > wives
    > of effective, non-effective and pensioned European non-commissioned and
    > inferior grades of the Honourable Company’s service, such women being the
    > daughters of European soldiers who have been educated at Regimental or
    > other
    > established Military schools, and also to East Indian women, wives of
    > Drummers, Buglers, etc., the offspring of European fathers married to
    > women
    > of the same description.
    > N.B. This boon is extended to all East Indian women who were wives of
    > European Soldiers, etc. as above on 1st November 1840 without reference to
    > parentage or place of education. It will be extended as an indulgence to
    > claimants married subsequently to that date who can produce a certificate
    > from a clergyman or other Public Functionary stating that such instruction
    > as the daughter of a Christian soldier should receive has been bestowed
    > upon
    > her, but each case must be submitted for the consideration and order of
    > Government.
    > Hope this helps
    > Good Hunting!
    > Peter Bailey

    PETER,

    THANK YOU VERY MUCH. I’LL USE THE FIBIS SITE MUCH MORE NOW.
    I JUST FOUND A USEFUL, RATHER OBSCURE, ARTICLE CALLED Haemoglobin D (B
    Punjab) in an East Anglian Family WHICH CONTAINS USEFUL INFO IN THIS REGARD.
    SHOULD I UPLOAD THIS TO FIBIS WIKI? HERE IS AN EXTRACT.
    “The provision of Christian orphanages and marriage allowances for soldiers
    marrying Eurasian women suggests that one solution of the problem was
    recognized by the authorities. The First Madras European Regiment paid
    European wives of soldiers five rupees a month and East Indian [= Eurasian]
    wives, if at the same time daughters of European soldiers, 32 rupees a month
    (Neill I843). In I822 in Bombay the five rupees per month payable to
    European women was now granted to ‘women of colour, natives of the West
    Indies, married to European soldiers and who may have accompanied their
    husbands from Europe to India’. It was also given to ‘wives of European
    non-commis-sioned officers and soldiers upon this establishment who are the
    offspring of native women of European fathers, and who have been or shall be
    married out of the Central School of the Bombay Education Society, or who
    not having been educated at the School, shall be provided with a certificate
    of Christian education and good character from the Chaplain at the stations
    at which they have habitually resided’ (Aitchison I824). The regulations
    concerning West Indian wives demonstrates the return of at least some
    coloured brides (probably of African origin) when the regiment was
    repatriated to England. It is apparent that at this time the pure Indian
    would be unlikely to become a soldier’s wife as she would not be eligible
    for marriage allowance. An assessment of then umber of inter-racial
    marriages.In order to establish the likelihood of detecting haemoglobin D a
    Punjab in Norfolk it is necessary to have an indication of the number of
    marriages occurring between British troops and Indian or part-Indian women.
    Children of extra-marital relationships would not have returned to England
    with their fathers. No figures for marriage appear to be available and
    investigation of regimental records show in very great majority that the
    names of the brides were British. This would be expected if these were
    Eurasian brides. Fortunately one regiment for a brief period (I840-63)
    recorded the nationality of the bride. This regiment was a Company regiment,
    the I osth Madras 2nd European Regiment. It had a strength of about one
    thousand men and was recruited solely in Ireland and the United Kingdom
    (Anon. I87I). The regiment served in India until I874 becoming incorporated
    into the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry when Company and Royal troops
    were merged. The records are in poor condition, partly illegible and with
    pages missing. Between I840 and I863 one hundred and eighty-six marriages
    are recorded with a record of the woman’s parentage made up as follows: 67
    European, I I I Indo-Briton, 7 East Indian, I Indian. Thirty-five marriages,
    in which the date is defaced, have been included in the above since from
    their position in the register they might reasonably have occurred in this
    period. In this period, ninety additional marriages were recorded, where the
    race was illegible or the marriage recorded on the orthodox regimental
    marriage form, where there is no mention of the bride’s origin. It is of
    interest that all the names of the brides were British except the Indian
    with the name Chinnamah, who would most likely be an Indian Christian. If
    the semen were representative, each year British troops married about 400
    Indo-Britons and twenty-five East Indians and Indians.This may well have
    been con-tinued for about a hundred years and, if so, one would expect the
    total marriages to be 40,000 to Indo-Britons and 2,500 to East Indian or
    Indian. It is obviously un-fortunate that this conclusion is, of necessity,
    based on a few men over a limited period. The Indo-Britona nd East Indian.T
    he offspring of a racially mixed marriage involving British father and
    Indian mother has been called several names. Apart from the word
    ‘half-caste’ they are referred to as East Indian, Indo-British, Eurasian,
    and Anglo-Indian.
    These names may well alter their meaning with time: at some periods an
    Anglo-Indian was an English person born in India and this even is the
    definition of Indo-Britoni n the Century Dictionary(I 899). However, T. G.
    Clarke (I 878) informs us that the term Indo-Briton was more or less
    accepted in preference to the epithet ‘half-caste’, more especially as the
    Government had chosen to adopt it in their order as distinguishing the class
    from the pure European. W. H. Carey in his history of the East India Company
    from i6oo to I858 is also emphatic that from I827 ‘Indo-Briton’ implies an
    offspring of a racially mixed marriage. It is puzzling why the term East
    Indian is still used by the regimental recorder and it appears reasonable
    that those referred to were Eurasians not regarded as of British descent,
    probably French or Portuguese. The introduction of the term ‘Indo-Briton’ in
    I827 was undoubtedly an effort to obtain greater loyalty from persons whose
    living conditions were purposely not always made easy by the authorities.”

    I GATHER THERE ARE NO RECORDS OF THESE ALLOWANCES. CORRECT? THEY MAY HAVE
    TOLD US SO MUCH…..EG…… WIVES NAMES, “PARENTAGE” OF THE WIFE SEEING
    THIS WAS CRITICAL IN ENTITLEMENT. ALSO, IF AN SOLDIER/OFFICER AND HIS WIFE
    WERE NOT ON IT, THEN A GOOD ASSUMPTION TO FOLLOW UP, MAY BE THAT HIS “WIFE”
    WAS NOT ANGO-INDIAN , EG, AN INDIAN, – AND NOT MARRIED. IE, WHY FOREGO AN
    ON-GOING ALLOWANCE!

    IAN MACDONNELL

     
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